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Student Spotlight: Carissa Slater

Dreams of Becoming the first Female Sports Commentator

April 21, 2017

Scouted by talent agencies and soccer teams, Running Start student, Carissa Slater dreams of becoming the first female sports commentator.

Carissa Slater is a firecracker of a person. If she has a goal, she sets out to conquer. She first started doing acting when she was in second grade and was soon spotted by two acting agencies. “They offered me some commercials, but once soccer became more serious to me, I just gave up on that,” Slater said.

In soccer matches, Slater puts her heart and soul into the game. “I feel a rush of adrenaline,” Slater said. “It excites me. I like to keep things simple, but with soccer I get complete focus.”

Slater, along with her two siblings, is a part of a sports family. Her mother was a gymnast until she injured her back; father was a football and baseball enthusiast, until work took over; one sister was into cheer, while the other did equestrian training.

“They don’t pressure me to succeed,” Slater said. “We do it just for fun.”

This ambitious soccer player has been through many adversities. In middle school, she was bullied for being overweight. “One boy in my PE class called me ‘fatso’ and then ‘oinked’ at me,” Slater said. “I later punched that kid.”

One of her worst experiences was with soccer when her coach thought she wasn’t fit for the team. “Everyone was getting a callback and I was very nervous,” Slater said. “I finally got a call-back and it felt like a slap to the face. He said I was not ‘good enough and did not make the team.’ I cried, but I decided to push on.”

When Slater was younger, she dreamed of becoming a soccer player. It was when she began her junior year of high when she started thinking about the sports broadcasting field.

“I started to become more realistic about my career and researched women in sports broadcasting. I want to be a commentator rather than one of the field reporters,” she said.

For her English 101 class at Pierce, she was asked to pick any topic of her choice, so she decided to research about women in sports broadcasting. Slater decided to do an online panel with her friends on whether they would like to see a female sports commentator. About 71 percent said that they were not okay with it.

“Many people go into sports journalism and change their major because they realize they don’t have what it takes. I want to make a name for myself,” Slater said.

With her sister’s lessons and her retail experience, Carissa Slater is becoming a compassionate, patient speaker. “In retail, I had to control my temper, listen to customers and try to help them however I can. It taught me how to read people,” Slater said. “When I was working with horses, I learned self-control and time management. It let me reflect and taught me to appreciate the value of work.”

Scouted by talent agencies and soccer teams, Running Start student, Carissa Slater dreams of becoming the first female sports commentator.

Carissa Slater is a firecracker of a person. If she has a goal, she sets out to conquer. She first started doing acting when she was in second grade and was soon spotted by two acting agencies. “They offered me some commercials, but once soccer became more serious to me, I just gave up on that,” Slater said.

In soccer matches, Slater puts her heart and soul into the game. “I feel a rush of adrenaline,” Slater said. “It excites me. I like to keep things simple, but with soccer I get complete focus.”

Slater, along with her two siblings, is a part of a sports family. Her mother was a gymnast until she injured her back; father was a football and baseball enthusiast, until work took over; one sister was into cheer, while the other did equestrian training.

“They don’t pressure me to succeed,” Slater said. “We do it just for fun.”

This ambitious soccer player has been through many adversities. In middle school, she was bullied for being overweight. “One boy in my PE class called me ‘fatso’ and then ‘oinked’ at me,” Slater said. “I later punched that kid.”

One of her worst experiences was with soccer when her coach thought she wasn’t fit for the team. “Everyone was getting a callback and I was very nervous,” Slater said. “I finally got a call-back and it felt like a slap to the face. He said I was not ‘good enough and did not make the team.’ I cried, but I decided to push on.”

When Slater was younger, she dreamed of becoming a soccer player. It was when she began her junior year of high when she started thinking about the sports broadcasting field.

“I started to become more realistic about my career and researched women in sports broadcasting. I want to be a commentator rather than one of the field reporters,” she said.

For her English 101 class at Pierce, she was asked to pick any topic of her choice, so she decided to research about women in sports broadcasting. Slater decided to do an online panel with her friends on whether they would like to see a female sports commentator. About 71 percent said that they were not okay with it.

“Many people go into sports journalism and change their major because they realize they don’t have what it takes. I want to make a name for myself,” Slater said.

With her sister’s lessons and her retail experience, Carissa Slater is becoming a compassionate, patient speaker. “In retail, I had to control my temper, listen to customers and try to help them however I can. It taught me how to read people,” Slater said. “When I was working with horses, I learned self-control and time management. It let me reflect and taught me to appreciate the value of work.”

Scouted by talent agencies and soccer teams, Running Start student, Carissa Slater dreams of becoming the first female sports commentator.

Carissa Slater is a firecracker of a person. If she has a goal, she sets out to conquer. She first started doing acting when she was in second grade and was soon spotted by two acting agencies. “They offered me some commercials, but once soccer became more serious to me, I just gave up on that,” Slater said.

In soccer matches, Slater puts her heart and soul into the game. “I feel a rush of adrenaline,” Slater said. “It excites me. I like to keep things simple, but with soccer I get complete focus.”

Slater, along with her two siblings, is a part of a sports family. Her mother was a gymnast until she injured her back; father was a football and baseball enthusiast, until work took over; one sister was into cheer, while the other did equestrian training.

“They don’t pressure me to succeed,” Slater said. “We do it just for fun.”

This ambitious soccer player has been through many adversities. In middle school, she was bullied for being overweight. “One boy in my PE class called me ‘fatso’ and then ‘oinked’ at me,” Slater said. “I later punched that kid.”

One of her worst experiences was with soccer when her coach thought she wasn’t fit for the team. “Everyone was getting a callback and I was very nervous,” Slater said. “I finally got a call-back and it felt like a slap to the face. He said I was not ‘good enough and did not make the team.’ I cried, but I decided to push on.”

When Slater was younger, she dreamed of becoming a soccer player. It was when she began her junior year of high when she started thinking about the sports broadcasting field.

“I started to become more realistic about my career and researched women in sports broadcasting. I want to be a commentator rather than one of the field reporters,” she said.

For her English 101 class at Pierce, she was asked to pick any topic of her choice, so she decided to research about women in sports broadcasting. Slater decided to do an online panel with her friends on whether they would like to see a female sports commentator. About 71 percent said that they were not okay with it.

“Many people go into sports journalism and change their major because they realize they don’t have what it takes. I want to make a name for myself,” Slater said.

With her sister’s lessons and her retail experience, Carissa Slater is becoming a compassionate, patient speaker. “In retail, I had to control my temper, listen to customers and try to help them however I can. It taught me how to read people,” Slater said. “When I was working with horses, I learned self-control and time management. It let me reflect and taught me to appreciate the value of work.”

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